Boston has a rich history of markets. In 1634 the town voted to establish a market at the site of the Old State House. According to Governor John Winthrop’s journal, the market was located there because it was the center of all that was important — the church, the meeting house, the public pillory, and the whipping post. — Thea Breite and Lisa Tuite

July 20 1933 / fromthearchive / Boston Globe Archive photo / Buyers with their horse teams and trucks waited for the whistle indicating the big terminal market was open. The big terminal market by the train tracks in South Boston opened at 6 a.m. . A blackboard chart told buyers just what was available, how many cars of cucumbers, how many of beans, were on hand.<br /><br />

July 20, 1933: Buyers with their horse teams and trucks waited for the whistle indicating that the big terminal market was open. The big terminal market by the train tracks in South Boston opened at 6 a.m. A blackboard chart told buyers just what was available, how many cars of cucumbers, how many of beans, were on hand.

October 5 1933 / fromthearchive / Globe Archive photo / Commerce at the farmer's market scene at the foot of State street. Farmers could sell their produce in the public market place from midnight until 11 a.m. under a law passed by the Massachusetts Legislature in 1859.<br /><br />

Oct. 5, 1933: Commerce at the farmer’s market scene at the foot of State Street. Farmers could sell their produce in the public marketplace from midnight until 11 a.m. under a law passed by the Massachusetts Legislature in 1859.

1936 / fromthearchive / Globe Archive photo / North End pushcart vendors could sell you ten different varieties of bologna, as well as a wide selection of cheeses and vegetables.<br /><br />

1936: North End pushcart vendors could sell you 10 different varieties of bologna, as well as a wide selection of cheeses and vegetables.

1953 / fromthearchive / Globe Staff photo by Harry Holbrook / A crowded market district. While most of the advertising was for businesses long gone from the Boston scene, a Union Oyster House truck be seen in the middle left. Opened in 1826, it is Boston's oldest restaurant still in business today.<br /><br />

1953: A crowded market district. While most of the advertising was for businesses long gone from the Boston scene, a Union Oyster House truck can be seen in the middle left. Opened in 1826, the Union Oyster House is Boston’s oldest restaurant still in business today.

May 21 1963 / fromthearchive / Globe Staff photo by Paul J. Connell / Men whiled away the time playing cards between customers at a North End market on Salem street.<br /><br />

May 21, 1963: Men whiled away the time playing cards between customers at a North End market on Salem Street.

November 10 1967 / fromthearchive / Globe Staff photo by Joyce Dopkeen / Lots of choices at the Haymarket Square meat market for Mrs. Olive DeClements of Roxbury with her daughter, Kim Marie, 15 months old.<br /><br />

Nov. 10, 1967: Lots of choices at the Haymarket Square meat market for Olive DeClements of Roxbury with her daughter, Kim Marie, 15 months old.

May 23 1967 / fromthearchive / Globe Staff photo by Ted Dully / A long view of the activity at Quincy Market. The wholesalers who had set up shop around Faneuil Hall for generations, were closing up and moving into new wholesale and distributing facilities in Chelsea and Everett. Meat and poultry businesses were relocated to South Bay.<br /><br />

May 23, 1967: A long view of the activity at Quincy Market. The wholesalers who had set up shop around Faneuil Hall for generations were closing and moving into new wholesale and distributing facilities in Chelsea and Everett. Meat and poultry businesses were relocated to South Bay.

May 18 1973 / fromthearchive / Globe Staff photo by Charles Dixon / While one of his customers put an oyster to the taste test, vendor Joe Judge (wearing beret) sold some boiled crabs to another on a busy afternoon in Boston's Faneuil Hall market district.<br /><br />

May 18, 1973: While one of his customers put an oyster to the taste test, vendor Joe Judge (wearing beret) sold some boiled crabs to another on a busy afternoon in Boston’s Faneuil Hall market district.

 August 7 1973 / fromthearchive / Globe Staff photo by Ted Dully / It was a hot day - the kind of day one would expect to sell lots of watermelon - but vendor Cosmos Neridella and his young assistant, Randy Ulness, 9, both of Somerville, managed to sneak in a little shuteye at their watermelon stand at the Faneuil Hall market.<br /><br />

Aug. 7, 1973: It was a hot day — the kind of day one would expect to sell lots of watermelon — but vendor Cosmos Neridella and his young assistant, Randy Ulness, 9, both of Somerville, managed to sneak in a little shuteye at their watermelon stand at the Faneuil Hall market.

 

* BOSTON GLOBE ARCHIVE, July 2014