It was a night of Old Men and pregnant women at the 80th Annual Academy Awards.
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Joel and Ethan Coen’s No Country for Old Men, considered the frontrunner going into the ceremony, lived up to expectations, racking up a leading four Oscars: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Supporting Actor for Javier Bardem.

In accepting the Best Director honor, Joel Coen recalled the experience of making movies alongside his brother since childhood.

“What we do now doesn’t feel that much different from what we were doing then,” Joel Coen said. “We’re very thankful to all of you out there for continuing to let us play in our corner of the sandbox.”

Taking the stage to accept his award earlier in the evening, Bardem paid tribute to the director brothers and their interesting choice of coiffure for his character.

“Thank you to the Coens for being crazy enough to think I could do that and for putting one of the most horrible haircuts in history over my head,” Bardem said in his acceptance speech, referring to the unflattering bowl cut he sports in the film.

Bardem, a native of Spain, was just the first European actor to collect an acting honor Sunday. In the end, all four major acting prizes went to Euro-thesps, with France’s Marion Cotillard winning Best Actress for La Vie en Rose, Britain’s Daniel Day-Lewis winning Best Actor for There Will Be Blood and compatriot Tilda Swinton taking home Best Supporting Actress for Michael Clayton.

Though It girl du jour Ellen Page was passed over in the Best Actress category for her turn as a pregnant teen in Juno, screenwriter Diablo Cody won the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay for the poignant coming-of-age tale.

“This is for the writers,” an emotional Cody said as she hoisted her statuette. “I want to thank all the writers. I especially want to thank my fellow nominees, because I worship you guys. I’m learning from you every day.”

Pregnancy—if not teen pregnancy—was certainly in the spotlight at the awards ceremony, with presenters Jessica Alba, Cate Blanchett and Nicole Kidman all showing off baby bumps of various sizes.

The blatant display of fertility even inspired host Jon Stewart to invent an imaginary award—creatively dubbed the Baby—which he presented to an absent Angelina Jolie.

“The Baby goes to…Angelina Jolie. Oh my god, Angelina Jolie. I’m just stunned. It goes to Angelina Jolie. That’s terrific,” Stewart joked. “Obviously Angelina couldn’t be with us tonight—it’s tough to get 17 babysitters on Oscars night. I’ll accept this Baby on her behalf.”

(Jolie has yet to officially confirm her pregnancy, but her bulging profile at Saturday’s Spirt Awards left little doubt.)

Other big winners of the night were The Bourne Ultimatum, which notched a trio of Oscars for Best Film Editing, Best Sound Editing and Best Sound Mixing, and There Will Be Blood, which picked up the statuette for Best Cinematography in addition to Day-Lewis’ acting win. La Vie en Rose was also a double winner, picking up the trophy for Best Makeup, on top of Cotillard’s acting victory.

Ratatouille was named Best Animated Film, marking the second Oscar victory for director Brad Bird, who also won in 2004 for The Incredibles.

The Oscar for Best Original Song went to “Falling Slowly” from the Irish film Once, which managed to beat out three songs from Enchanted and a song from August Rush for the win. In a rare do-over, Jon Stewart invited cowinner Markéta Irglová back to give her thank-you speech after the orchestra inadvertently played her offstage.

In an onstage meeting of pregnant woman and old man, Kidman presented the honorary Oscar to 98-year-old production designer Robert Boyle, in recognition of his contributions to classic films including North by Northwest, The Birds, Marnie and Mame.

It was something of a disappointing night for both Atonement and Michael Clayton, with both films losing out in six of the seven categories in which they were nominated. At least Clayton won in a glamour category; Atonement’s lone honor of the night came in the Best Original Score category.

In his second go-round as host, Stewart had plenty of material to work with, ranging from political quips to references to the recently ended writers’ strike.

“The fight is over,” he said at the opening of the show. “So tonight, welcome to the makeup sex.”

* By Sarah Hall (Sun, 24 Feb 2008)

George Clooney wasn’t supposed to say yes. A reporter interviews a movie star at a restaurant or a hotel lobby or an office, with his publicist lurking in the corner, ready to cut off any vaguely interesting questions. But to come over to my house for dinner? That’s a trap no sucker has ever shoved a famous foot into.

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Partly because there are so many unknowns—you’re stuck alone chatting up the family while the reporter cooks, you accidentally let slip a cruel joke about a wedding photo, you somehow use the bathroom wrong—and partly because who the hell wants to spend Saturday night stuck at some dork’s house eating undercooked lamb? Would Gwyneth Paltrow come over? Johnny Depp? But George Clooney said yes, of course, why not, sounds fun.

Clooney was the only star who could have said yes, because no other star wears his celebrity so easily. Nominated for another Oscar for Michael Clayton, Clooney has managed to become this era’s leading man without ever conveying the sense that he takes the role seriously. “He’s a throwback to what movie stars used to be,” says Grant Heslov, who has been friends with Clooney since they met in an acting class in 1983 and is now his partner at their new film and TV production company, Smoke House. “You see him and you think, Wouldn’t that be a great life? He seems like a man’s man. He seems like you could meet him at a bar and have a chat with him and it would be easy. And all of that is true.” Sid Ganis, president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, says no one works an Oscars event or the red carpet like him. “Clooney is a kind of exception to the rule of celebrity aloofness. Gregory Peck was that way. Totally open. Unabashed. You’ve got to be not afraid,” he says. No other stars are as unfreaked out by their own celebrity, since, like most politicians, they want it either too much or too little. And it’s that ability to be constantly not afraid that makes women love him. “As they say in England, he is up for it,” says Michael Clayton co-star Tilda Swinton. “That means up for pretty much any fun you can think of. He has a way of daring you—which, for those of us who cannot resist a bit of a laugh, can be irresistible.”

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Still, this was going to be uncomfortable, this reversal of the natural guest-host order. Three years ago, Clooney invited me to his huge Los Angeles house to interview him, and he was exactly the host you’d expect: relaxed, honest, easy. Four years ago, when I left a message with his publicist to set up a time to talk to him, he simply called my voice mail and left his home number. In the summer, at his six-house compound in Lake Como, Italy, he throws nightly Algonquin-style dinners featuring such guests as Al Gore, Walter Cronkite and Quincy Jones. “He’s an excellent host,” says Tony Gilroy, director of Michael Clayton. “He’s really smart about figuring out what people need and want. Are they hot? Happy? Cold? Thirsty? He has that ability to bend himself to the space he’s in and instantly adjust to the group he’s with.” So I wondered, Can George Clooney possibly be a guest? Or is that just against the natural order of things? And what would I even cook? All his assistant would say was, “He’ll eat whatever is cooking.”

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It’s 6:45 on Saturday night when the doorbell rings, a little late. Clooney hit traffic, his assistant called to say, on his way back from visiting his girlfriend in Las Vegas. He’s wearing faded jeans, black laced boots and a zip-up sweater, and he looks less like a movie star than a normal, un-Botoxed 46-year-old unmarried guy coming over for dinner, but he also looks like he’s excited to be here because wherever he is, George Clooney’s also there. He hasn’t brought any wine, and I worry that this guesting thing is just not going to work out. I offer him a glass of red, and he suggests that we sit on the couch, and soon we’re talking about real estate, and it’s fine, and next thing I know, he’s getting a tour of the house. A tour of the house? The man owns a mansion in L.A. and a 15-bedroom villa in Italy! Why don’t I just show the Oscar-winning actor the tape of me in my high school production of Bye Bye Birdie? But he’s nailing this guest role: “I love old houses like this.” “You kept the original stuff.” “It’s nice to have a guest room.” “I love the arches on the shower.” I’m convinced that this is just a normal Clooney Saturday, that he spends his nights Charles Kuralting around L.A., knocking on doors, eating whatever’s cooking and chatting about politics. Within 15 minutes he made me feel comfortable in my own house. Which isn’t so easy when a giant celebrity is over for dinner.

It’s becoming clear to me already that somehow this guy, even in my house, really is a movie star. Maybe the only one we have now. There are plenty of huge box-office draws (Will Smith, Tom Hanks, Julia Roberts, Ben Stiller, Adam Sandler, Johnny Depp) and even more famous celebrities (Brad Pitt, Tom Cruise, Angelina Jolie, Jennifer Lopez, Lindsay Lohan), but no one besides Clooney is so gracefully both. After an actor achieves media saturation, there’s actually an inverse relation between fame and box-office receipts: people aren’t going to pay for what they can get for free. “There are so many media outlets and this enormous suck on information about you, it’s hard to maintain any kind of aura of specialness and mystery about the work itself, which is trying to be other people,” says director Tony Gilroy. “It was a lot easier to be Bill Holden than it is to be George Clooney.” Or as Clooney says, “Clark Gable wouldn’t have been Clark Gable if there was Access Hollywood and Entertainment Tonight.”

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His strategy for being a movie star is pretty simple, if counterintuitive: he makes fun of himself. It’s the by-product of every successful person’s strategy, which is to figure out what the other person is thinking. “Before they could kill me on Batman & Robin, I said, ‘It’s a bad film, and I’m the worst thing in it.’ You try to defend an indefensible position, you’ll look like a schmuck. The guys I dig don’t do that. Look at Winston Churchill. He said, ‘These are our shortcomings. Now let’s get past it,'” Clooney says. He thinks that’s all Cruise needs to do. “I talked to him the other day, and he’s a good egg. There’s nothing self-serving about what he’s saying. He has to turn it into a way to make fun of himself.”

Clooney also preempts situations that might earn him ridicule later. So he has either turned down every gift bag he’s been offered or has put them up on eBay for charity. “I’ve been smart about that. Rich famous people getting free s___ looks bad. You look greedy. And I don’t need a cell phone with sparkles on it,” he says. He sends handwritten apology letters to the directors whose scenes he ripped off in the movies he directed—Mike Nichols, Sidney Lumet, Sydney Pollack. He drives an electric car and a Lexus hybrid but won’t be a spokesman for the environment because he flies a private jet. He feels passionately about Barack Obama but refuses his pleas to campaign for him—other than an introduction in late February in Cincinnati, Ohio—because he doesn’t want it to backfire into a Hollywood-vs.-the-heartland attack. And he downplays and occasionally jokes about his problems, which include a bad back and some short-term memory loss he sustained when working on Syriana, quiet. “I know what pisses people off about fame,” Clooney says. “It’s when famous people whine about it.”

It may look as if he is an effortless movie star, but he has actually given the job a lot of thought. He’s not manipulative, but he is calculating, following the rules he learned from his family. When his aunt Rosemary Clooney went from being on the cover of this magazine to seeing her fame burst because musical tastes changed, she battled depression and took pills for much of her life. He knows random luck will eventually take fame away, just as random luck made him a star. If NBC had put ER on Fridays instead of Thursdays, I might have had Jonathan Silverman over for dinner. And while Clooney didn’t get famous until his 30s, when ER hit, he had kind of always been famous because of his dad, a popular news anchor in Cincinnati. “From the moment I was born, I was watched by other people. I was taught to use the right fork. I was groomed for that in a weird way,” Clooney says. “You give enough. You play completely. You don’t say, I don’t talk about my personal life. People say they won’t talk about their personal life. And then they do. And even when the tabloids say really crappy things and it pisses you off and you know it’s not true, you have to at least publicly have a sense of humor about it.”

He’s just as calculating about his career choices. “He was offered a stupendous amount of money to continue to do Roseanne,” the sitcom he was on for 11 episodes, says his dad Nick Clooney. “I was thinking he could build a little nest egg and maybe acting would pay off after all. He said, ‘No, I’ll be in a cul-de-sac. I’ll be that guy, and that’s all I’ll be.'” He pitched sitcom pilots and dramas and eventually won an Oscar nomination for co-writing the original screenplay for Good Night, and Good Luck. He makes sure to not get stuck in one character or type of film. He has a Joel and Ethan Coen movie coming out in which he plays an idiot (as he did in their O Brother, Where Art Thou?), and he’s working on a movie about the founder of est and a comedy about the 1979 Tehran hostages who escaped. The next movie he directs and co-stars in is Leatherheads, a screwball comedy about pro football in the 1920s that comes out April 4. “After Syriana and Good Night, and Good Luck I was offered the Richard Clarke book and every issues movie,” Clooney says. “I didn’t want to be the issues guy because if the issues change, you’re done. The Facts of Life is a good example. If you’re a young heartthrob—which I never caught on as—those fans not only abandon you, but they’re embarrassed to have liked you. It’s the same thing with issues movies. I want to just be a director.”

He is good at slipping into many different worlds, even the one in my kitchen, where he is pouring in the egg mixture while I add the hot spaghetti for the carbonara. He reaches over and stirs the bacon, grabs a string bean from the pot and eats it. He is mad guesting, Olympic-level guesting. He’s been over for two hours, and it occurs to me that the smooth bastard must have turned off his cell phone before he got here. When I leave the table to check on the lamb, he puts extra bacon on my pasta. He’s doing impressions—Pat O’Brien confusedly reporting outside Clooney’s Como villa, expecting Pitt and Jolie’s wedding (Clooney had bought $1,500 worth of flowers and 15 tabletops as a prank on gossip reporters); James Carville denigrating John Kerry’s campaigning skills; Daniel Day-Lewis doing John Huston in There Will Be Blood.

We’re deep into a second bottle of Barolo when Clooney cuts into his rack of lamb, and, oh, there would be blood. This is why a star wouldn’t take this invite, wouldn’t be here, staring at a red-raw-inedible piece of meat. He says it’s fine. I grab it, put it in the oven but forget to turn on the heat, so when I take it back out, it’s just as raw. Fine again, he says. I put it back one more time. He takes more pasta and salad. Rattled, I drop the salt. “Throw it over your left shoulder,” he says. “That’s just bad mojo. You know it, and I know it.” He may not believe in religion, but luck, Clooney has learned from his family, cannot be messed with.

One person Clooney will mess with—the thing he keeps coming back to the more we drink—is what a massive loser Bill O’Reilly is. It’s an irrational feud because every time O’Reilly gets to be as important as Clooney, O’Reilly comes out way ahead. But Clooney can’t help himself. He keeps talking about O’Reilly, and the little traps he’s set for him and how thrilled he is when he falls into them. It’s as if Clooney loves O’Reilly because he gives him permission to be an irrational 8-year-old. Maybe that’s why anyone loves O’Reilly. But he is also the anti-Clooney, donning a public persona, one that’s humorless and incapable of self-effacement. It’s as if someone created for Clooney his own Elmer Fudd.

One of the things O’Reilly has taken issue with is Clooney’s involvement in the crisis in Darfur, saying it’s reverse racism from someone who didn’t care about the Arabs being killed by Saddam Hussein. Clooney got interested in Darfur in 2005 after the campaign for Oscar votes for Syriana and Good Night, and Good Luck made him feel dirty. “You’re campaigning for yourself. To compete for art,” he says. His dad was also dejected and angry after losing an election for Congress, and Clooney had been reading about the lack of attention being given to Darfur, so the two went on a trip to Africa to shoot footage. Clooney wasn’t able to get into Darfur until late January, when the U.N. said it would give him an official title. “I have a U.N. passport. It says ‘Messenger of Peace’ on it. It’s very cool,” he says.

The Darfur organization he helped found, Not on Our Watch, has given away more than $9 million. But now, just three weeks back from having a 14-year-old border guard shove a machine gun at his chest, after recovering from malaria, after helicoptering out of N’Djamena, Chad, in a sandstorm three days before the rebels sacked it, he wonders if his critics are right, if this scheme to use celebrity to bring attention to the world’s plights isn’t, if not vanity, at least striving after wind. “I’ve been very depressed since I got back. I’m terrified that it isn’t in any way helping. That bringing attention can cause more damage. You dig a well or build a health-care facility and they’re a target for somebody,” he says. “A lot more people know about Darfur, but absolutely nothing is different. Absolutely nothing.”

He feels his advocacy is not even accomplishing as much as his family did during the embarrassing Christmas day trips his dad would arrange every year, when they would show up with gifts for a family who wrote to his dad’s TV station, asking for help. Now he wonders if it is better to give money and get out of the way, as he does when he gets off Highway 101 at Laurel Canyon Blvd., where there’s always a person begging for money. “You think, This is a $20 light. So you hope to catch the light. And then you feel guilty for hoping to catch the light,” he says. “People say, They’ll buy booze. Fair enough. They need it.” Clooney, having helped knock off two bottles of red and two bottles of dessert wine—all after drinking heavily in Vegas the night before—is not one to deny someone else alcohol.

It’s past midnight; we’re both pretty buzzed. He’s telling me how he wakes up every morning at 5:30 to the hoots of a giant owl and how he climbs into his hot tub so he can hoot back, mesmerized by nature, like Tony Soprano and his ducks, when this alarm starts shrieking. Clooney, not a man of inaction, especially in a moment of crisis like this, stands on my dining-room table, unscrews a panel in the ceiling and, finding nothing, makes me go outside and carry a huge ladder with him up two flights to my garage upstairs—where he climbs into an area I’ve never dared go, crawling along the beams with a screwdriver between his teeth. Finding nothing, he climbs down, knocks the dirt off his jeans, blows the dust out of his nose, rinses his hands and returns to the table. The shriek starts again, and Clooney thinks for a few seconds, ducks down and yanks the carbon monoxide detector out of the outlet. “Either it needs a battery,” he says, “or we have six seconds to live.”

At 1:30 he gets up to leave. He tells me that the next time I have interviewees over for dinner, I should trick them by passing his house off as mine, maybe with some hired servants, smoking a pipe, pretending journalism is something I do as a lark, separate from my silver-mining interests.

As he leaves, I feel as if I failed. In seven hours, I wasn’t able to find a part of Clooney different from the one everyone already knows. As he retreats in his movie-star car to his movie-star lair with his giant-owl sidekick, I feel pretty sure he never separates the public from the private. It explains, at least, why he sucked as Batman.

Then two nights later I get a chance to run the experiment again. My wife and I figure we’ll check out the sushi place Clooney said he’s been going to for 15 years. When we walk in, there’s only one occupied table, and of course it’s Clooney, his girlfriend, his assistant and a friend he met the first day he moved to Los Angeles. He’s unprepared for me, out in the open, vulnerable. But he yanks over a table, puts it next to his, tells us what to order, hands us food from his plate, shows us photos of him and the other guy at the table with Keith Richards, reads the cheesy lines he’s just been faxed for his Oscar presenting, fights for the check and generally hosts the crap out of us. Clooney is a movie star not because he’s overwhelmingly electric or handsome or fascinating. After two very fun nights, I can tell you that he really isn’t any of those things. George Clooney is a movie star because he’s happiest when he controls how everyone around him feels. Because that’s what movies do.

* By Joel Stein (TIME) With reporting by Amy Lennard Goehner

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We Should Fight for contributing ours “granite of sand” in the construction of a world to pacify and supportive. A world that always says STOP to terrorism.

Therefore, to achieve a world environment to pacify, I believe that we must to begin for ourselves, in our daily life, in our house, with our family, with ours neighboring, our friends, our coworkers.

Likewise we are supportive WITH THE PEOPLE POOREST around of the world. We must give them real supportive and disinterested love, so we are better persons, more solidarity and we will be contributing to build a better world where there be not place for any type of terrorism.

See you later.
Carlos Tiger without Time

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Some consider fatal to have feminist overtones. Do you think it’s a political film?

I think Fatal Attraction had a tremendous effect on this country when it came out. I think people brought political baggage to the film. I was astonished that so many feminists didn’t like Alex Forrest because they thought it was a terrible portrayal of a single working woman.
You can’t play somebody that represents all single women.
But she has become, I think, a symbol of women fighting back.

As an actress who is no longer in her 20s or 30s, are you frustrated with the roles you are offered in Hollywood?

I can’t complain. I think older women are very hard to write for. I really do, I mean culturally speaking. At a certain age you’re supposed to be in the back room rocking the grandchildren.

What do you do to look so young?
I think a lot of it is genetic, but I always was kind of a jock.
I went on my first triathlon in May, and my goal was just to finish, so my time was horrible…

* Summarized of U.S.News & World Report, June 4, 2007

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Never go on trips with anyone you do not love.
Ernest Hemingway

Never mistake motion for action.
Ernest Hemingway

Never think that war, no matter how necessary, nor how justified, is not a crime.
Ernest Hemingway

No weapon has ever settled a moral problem. It can impose a solution but it cannot guarantee it to be a just one.
Ernest Hemingway

Once we have a war there is only one thing to do. It must be won. For defeat brings worse things than any that can ever happen in war.
Ernest Hemingway

Or don’t you like to write letters. I do because it’s such a swell way to keep from working and yet feel you’ve done something.
Ernest Hemingway

Personal columnists are jackals and no jackal has been known to live on grass once he had learned about meat – no matter who killed the meat for him.
Ernest Hemingway

Some people show evil as a great racehorse shows breeding. They have the dignity of a hard chancre.
Ernest Hemingway

That is what we are supposed to do when we are at our best – make it all up – but make it up so truly that later it will happen that way.
Ernest Hemingway

That terrible mood of depression of whether it’s any good or not is what is known as The Artist’s Reward.
Ernest Hemingway

The 1st panacea of a mismanaged nation is inflation of the currency; the 2nd is war. Both bring a temporary prosperity; a permanent ruin.
Ernest Hemingway

The best way to find out if you can trust somebody is to trust them.
Ernest Hemingway

The first panacea for a mismanaged nation is inflation of the currency; the second is war. Both bring a temporary prosperity; both bring a permanent ruin. But both are the refuge of political and economic opportunists.
Ernest Hemingway

The game of golf would lose a great deal if croquet mallets and billiard cues were allowed on the putting green.
Ernest Hemingway

The man who has begun to live more seriously within begins to live more simply without.
Ernest Hemingway

The only thing that could spoil a day was people. People were always the limiters of happiness except for the very few that were as good as spring itself.
Ernest Hemingway

The shortest answer is doing the thing.
Ernest Hemingway

The sinews of war are five – men, money, materials, maintenance (food) and morale.
Ernest Hemingway

The world breaks everyone and afterward many are stronger at the broken places.
Ernest Hemingway

The world breaks everyone, and afterward, some are strong at the broken places.
Ernest Hemingway

The world is a fine place and worth the fighting for and I hate very much to leave it.
Ernest Hemingway

There are some things which cannot be learned quickly, and time, which is all we have, must be paid heavily for their acquiring. They are simple things, and because it takes a man’s life to know them, the little new that each man gets from life is very costly and the only heritage he has to leave.
Ernest Hemingway

There is no friend as loyal as a book.
Ernest Hemingway

There is no lonelier man in death, except the suicide, than that man who has lived many years with a good wife and then outlived her. If two people love each other there can be no happy end to it.
Ernest Hemingway

There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.
Ernest Hemingway

There’s no one thing that is true. They’re all true.
Ernest Hemingway

They wrote in the old days that it is sweet and fitting to die for one’s country. But in modern war, there is nothing sweet nor fitting in your dying. You will die like a dog for no good reason.
Ernest Hemingway

To be a successful father… there’s one absolute rule: when you have a kid, don’t look at it for the first two years.
Ernest Hemingway

Wars are caused by undefended wealth.
Ernest Hemingway

What is moral is what you feel good after, and what is immoral is what you feel bad after.
Ernest Hemingway

When I have an idea, I turn down the flame, as if it were a little alcohol stove, as low as it will go. Then it explodes and that is my idea.
Ernest Hemingway

When people talk, listen completely. Most people never listen.
Ernest Hemingway

When you have shot one bird flying you have shot all birds flying. They are all different and they fly in different ways but the sensation is the same and the last one is as good as the first.
Ernest Hemingway

Why should anybody be interested in some old man who was a failure?
Ernest Hemingway

You can wipe out your opponents. But if you do it unjustly you become eligible for being wiped out yourself.
Ernest Hemingway

You’re beautiful, like a May fly.
Ernest Hemingway

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By Dan Marsh

I don’t know if you are aware of this or not, but apparently, Paris Hilton has been involved in some sort of legal fracas in L.A.

Perhaps you’ve seen it on the news. Paris, locked in the back seat of a patrol car, screaming on her way to jail. Paris, in better days, posing on various runways, with that stupid, smug, rich-girl look on her face, mugging for photographers.

I’m guessing you’ve seen this coverage, I don’t know. Perhaps some of you have been living under a rock the last few days. Perhaps some of you have never even heard of Paris Hilton. I wish I hadn’t.

I think the news media is a wonderful invention, I really do, but I also think that, somehow, the media has gone off the rails. Somewhere, somebody in an air-conditioned office in New York or L.A. or Atlanta decided that, you know what, people don’t really want “news.” They want to be entertained. Sure, there has been a terrible slaughter in Darfur; of course, there are millions dying of disease and starvation in Africa; and, oh yeah, our troops are getting killed by the dozens every day in a delightful little corner of the globe known as Iraq.

We don’t care about any of that.

Quick, tell me the reason for the genocide in Darfur.

Quick, tell me how the G-8 summit may or may not have positively affected the poor and starving masses in Africa.

Quick, what’s the latest on al-Qaida in Pakistan?

I’ll bet you don’t know, because all weekend, we have been fed a steady diet of Paris Hilton on every major news network. Don’t feel bad, I can’t answer any of those questions, either. I can tell you that Paris mouthed “I love you” to her mom while the judge was throwing the book at her. I can tell you the name of the Los Angeles County sheriff who unlawfully yanked Paris from jail where she allegedly belonged. (Lee Baca, brother of Chew.) I couldn’t tell you the current status of the Taliban in Afghanistan, or how much money we spent on Iraq this past week.

The media has trivialized the important and made monumental the utterly trivial. Paris Hilton is a spoiled brat. I don’t care about Paris Hilton. Yet Fox News re-hashed FRIDAY’S coverage of The Hilton Event on SATURDAY NIGHT’S prime-time broadcast. I can only assume nothing of importance was taking place anywhere else in the world. If so, Fox, MSNBC, CNN, ABC, NBC and CBS chose to ignore it.

I ran across an interesting story the other day. According to the Project for Excellence in Journalism, an independent think tank, Fox News, in recent months, devoted significantly more air time to the death of Anna Nicole Smith than any of its rivals. That’s not all. Fox is also providing less coverage of the war in Iraq than its rivals. I’ll quote from the story.

“Fox spent half as much time covering the Iraq war than MSNBC during the first three months of the year, and considerably less than CNN. The difference was more stark during daytime news hours than in prime-time opinion shows. The Iraq war occupied 20 percent of CNN’s daytime news hole and 18 percent of MSNBC’s. On Fox, the war was talked about only 6 percent of the time. Another story that has reflected poorly on the Bush administration, the controversy over U.S. attorney firings, also received more attention on MSNBC (8 percent of the newshole) and CNN (4 percent) than on Fox (2 percent), the Project for Excellence in Journalism found.

“If Fox’s audience is dominated by Republicans who are disgusted about hearing bad news on Iraq, it would stand to reason that you’d want to feed them less of it. Bill O’Reilly touched upon that idea on the air one night last December, telling viewers that the lowest-rated segment of his show the previous night was when Iraq was discussed. Ratings jumped at talk about Britney Spears, he said.

“The danger is whether those concerns eat away at journalistic credibility.”

My question is, are we really getting “fair and balanced” coverage of any issue from any of the nets? The obvious answer is no, not when they are shoving Paris Hilton down our throats 24/7.

Then again, do we really want to hear “bad news”? Do we really want to know what’s going on in Iraq, or are we more comfortable staring down our noses at Paris? You decide.

Dan Marsh is the editor of the Daily Siftings Herald

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The movie, which depicts the brave stand of 300 Spartans against a marauding army of hundreds of thousands of Persians at Thermopylae in 480 BC. “Is about as violent as ‘Apocalypto’ and twice as stupid,”

The Iranians, who presumably don’t screen many Mel Gibson movies, were nonetheless even more offended. The movie is aimed at “humiliating” Iranians, who are descendants of the ancient Persians.

300 is “part of a comprehensive U.S. psychological warfare aimed at Iranian Culture” And this was the headline in the Ayan No newspaper: HOLLYWOOD DECLARES WAR ON IRANIANS.

Source: Summarized of Newsweek, March 2007

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The concept of beauty in this life is relative; therefore the concept of Beauty is more extensive than we know.

In the dictionary of the Real Spanish Academy (2001) we can see the following definitions:

1) “Property of the things that causes love them, instilling in us spiritual delight. This property exists in the nature and in the artistic and literary works.”

2) “notable Woman by its beauty.”

Analyzing the two definitions that this prestigious dictionary gives us, we can deduce that the first one is  more complete definition through the time.

A good book transcends and remains in the time; although its author have died, for example with Miguel of Cervantes and his masterpiece “Don Quijote de la Mancha” (1605)

The same thing we can say of other artists and poets that left us, in a permanent way, the beauty of their works.

Also the spiritual aspect we can observe it directly, since we awake and we walk in our environment with representatives of the three kingdoms, animal, vegetable and mineral.

We can see beautiful flowers, pretty gardens, imposing mountains,  natural beauty or refreshing landscapes or beaches and mysterious rivers.

All this one and many other things more, they show us a mosaic of natural things, according to our environment,. They permit feel us alive and surrounded by natural beauty.

The second definition, on the beauty of the woman, is relative. Therefore the human beauty or physics beauty has a time of duration, limited in years.

 Therefore who is grasped only to this beauty will be carried large disillusionments in some years more.

On the other hand who cultivates more the love by the beauty of the nature, the good literary or artistic works. Even by the interior beauty that many human beings have it. Then, we will have the beauty in a permanent way with us.

See you later,
CARLOS (Tiger without Time)

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We should to have respect for other country, about its national anthem, its flag, its culture and respect its citizens. And we cannot go to another country to make fun of its native symbols and of its citizens, for to do money for the movies.

Sadly it did actor Sacha Baron Cohen (Borat), who mocked of Kazakhstan (Few years ago it was part of Russia)
Also taking advantage of its condition of English citizen for made mocked of some politicians and of the American national anthem in a stadium in Texas.

Of course mister “Borat” is funny in his other scenes of his movie; but those two big mistakes: He mocked Kazakhstan and mocked of the national anthem, I believe that it was not funny.

Looks at the video (down)

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See you later
CARLOS (Tiger without Time)

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It is very interesting the evolution of the Blogs, like group, as a new massive media, using modern technologies and the evolution of the Internet.

If we concentrate on those people that make a serious Blogs, to communicate us, direct or indirectly, some news, ideas, comments, experiences or simply to entertain us with some video or photos.

Besides the fact to be able to share new know-how or experiences of people of everywhere around the world. And, in a diversity of themes that would be very long to mention.

All this new form of modern communication, of people with access to Internet, that each day they are more. So, how everything in this life, it has a good side and it has a bad side.

The good side is that without doing long and costly travel, we can know people of almost everywhere around the world and to learn their form of seeing the world and to learn his culture and form of living.

Also the Blogs can be like our curriculum of personal presentation to other people. According to our design of Blog we will get up people that have something interests in what we publish, and so will be born a fruitful friendship.

The bad side is that we can convert ourselves, in people that they are in a room with a PC, and they forget of the physical relations. Very important is the physical contact for to get good human relations.

Besides being able to make the mistake of idealizing to the people that know for Internet. Therefore, always the personal contact is decisive.

Thus, paraphrasing a great poet, the Blogs have begun to walk, they are Blogs travelers and they do road when It’s walking, and, now, when we return our view behind, we see distant and obsolete the starting point; therefore, not only, we leave wakes in the sea, but we leave wakes in the cyberspace.

See you soon,

CARLOS (Tiger without Time)

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1) Anna Nicole Smith
2) Global Warming
3) Immigration
4) Iraq
5) China
6) Health
7) India
8) Education
9) Iran
10) Obama
11) Bush
12) Astronaut
13) Gay
14) Sex
15) Women

* CARLOS (Tiger without Time)

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Happy year 2007 and  that obtain your goals of happiness, peace and welfare in your life

CARLOS (Tiger  without Time) 

That the love transcend the religions or ideologies that everybody have it and only a desire of love, peace, justice, solidarity and Tolerance, lead our lives today, tomorrow and always. 

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In this Christmas I Ask to God or the infinite forces of the Universe:  

I ask, in prayer that supports my friends and family that read this message, right now, and get the truth of this life and to apply it in their own present life.

So they will be happy and they getting remove the internal force that have themselves. 

That your thoughts, words and actions permit them obtain the lighting, love and truth that they need for transcend in mind, body and spirit. 

That the love transcend the religions or ideologies that everybody have it and only a desire of love, peace, justice, solidarity and Tolerance, lead our lives today, tomorrow and always. 

That Christmas be the start for this great crusade. 

Remember, friends and family that all our spiritual power is inside of us.  We don’t depend on other people to be happy or for remove all our potential. 

Only you can do that    

LOVE, PEACE and HAPPINESS by ALWAYS.   

CARLOS (Tiger without Time)  a verdad de esta vida para aplicarla en su propia vida actual y

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